Friends of Kaisei / Age of Plastics

27 08 2010

25 August 2010 Wednesday
Latitude 33 degrees 03 minutes North
Longitude 140 degrees 54 minutes West

Today we want to give special acknowledgment to our Second Mate, Art Lyman-Mercereau. Art is another valued friend and sea mate of Mary Crowley’s. Art’s background includes many years of captaining award-winning international racing yachts. He hails from the East Coast and grew up sailing. After marrying Marian Lyman (who we wish was with us, but she is ashore teaching), he settled down in Hawaii and briefly ran a fishing boat out of Oahu before starting his career as a Physics Professor. Art is a musician, playing saxophone, piano and harmonica. One can easily tell that Art loves being at sea as he has a sparkle in his eye and a smile as he carefully tunes the sails for good performance. Art’s background of sailing, fishing, physics and teaching make him an ideal person for Project Kaisei. It is great to watch Art sharing his wisdom with all of our young crew members, including his son, Kaniella.

Robin Otagaki is a sailor and recently retired Science Teacher, having won awards for being the best science teacher in the state of Hawaii. Robin is very interested in marine debris issues and we value his expertise in assisting us with messaging that will reach young people. Art, Robin and Drew Maples have been using our experiences aboard KAISEI to create and design collection methods. Robin’s smiling face, good humor and great singing voice makes him an excellent watch companion.

Drew, our skilled Bosun, sets a fine example as one of the hardest working people on board KAISEI. Originally from Maine, he has a background in sailing as well as boat building. He now lives in Juneau, Alaska. Drew is always willing to lend a hand in all important ship’s projects and leads the crew in maintenance on board KAISEI. He is another natural seafarer who is very happy at sea.

The weather remains calm and windless. We are definitely sailing through the “home” of our things that are thrown “away.” As all of us that are part of Project Kaisei will verify, there is clearly no “away.” Plastics can last for centuries!

Periodically we go through small areas that have a heavier concentration of debris, but in general, today there is a consistent flow of similar items to what we have been seeing. We hope to do more collections in the California current where we may find items that are newer to the ocean environment. The ocean current experts from the University of Hawaii, Nikolai Maximenko and his team, are extremely interested in verifying the age of items we collect to confirm how long they have been in the ocean environment.

“The fact that plastic lasts for centuries, combined with the magnitude of plastic proliferation in our global ocean, makes plastic the most deadly debris in the marine environment. Please join all of us in Project Kaisei / Ocean Voyages Institute and Ocean Conservancy in making changes in our awareness of disposable plastics to help our ocean, its creatures and ourselves.”

Mary Crowley
Project Kaisei /Ocean Voyages Institute

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One response

27 08 2010
jeremy

YOU ARE DOING A BRILLIANT JOB IN THE FACE OF LONG ODDS…BUT YOU WILL GO DOWN IN HISTORY AS HEROES TO SAVE THE PLANET YOU ARE ANOTHER SEA SHEPHERD !!

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